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Why in meetings, and when classes finish the teacher would say “dismissed!”, but not “dismiss”?

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    "You are dismissed" -> "Dismissed" Why would he use imperative here? – mplungjan May 20 '18 at 16:43
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    I do not know. I have always wondered why in some books I read, the chairman would say “dismissed!” in an imperative (past tense) form, but not “dismiss”. – Turki May 20 '18 at 16:51
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    Okay good, but let me repharse my question: in English, why the word dismissed is also used as an imperative form (not necessarily true, but has similiar meaning), so when the speaker says “dismissed!” It would mean you are allowed to leave. – Turki May 20 '18 at 16:59
  • It's not a unique case. 'Sold!' and ''Done!' are abbreviated speech acts. – Edwin Ashworth May 20 '18 at 17:02
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Dismiss in imperative is not a command to go away but telling people to dismiss someone.

I want you to fire him. Dismiss! Now!

Dismissed is not imperative past tense, just past tense.

"Dismissed" is short for "You are dismissed", e.g. you may leave. Not "Get out of here". It is a request - possibly sounding like a command, but that does not make the word imperative.

The sentence could be said to be in the imperative mood, but I am not certain of this in your example.

  • Okay good, but let me repharse my question: in English, why the word dismissed is also used as an imperative form (not necessarily true, but has similiar meaning), so when the speaker says “dismissed!” It would mean you are allowed to leave. – Turki May 20 '18 at 17:00
  • So what is the rephrased question? I believe I have answered the difference. – mplungjan May 20 '18 at 17:01
  • Forget about “dismiss” for now. I am asking about the past tense form of “dismissed”. Every time a chairman, or teacher would order students to allow them to go, he/she would literally say “dismissed!” I mean is this correct? Any non-native English speaker would be confused by the use of the past tense form here. – Turki May 20 '18 at 17:06
  • Yes it is completely correct and I, as a non-native speaker, was never confused after hearing it the first time and seeing the listeners disperse. – mplungjan May 20 '18 at 17:07
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To the best of my knowledge - If I 'dismiss' (present tense) somebody's opinions I choose (deliberately) to ignore what they are saying. If I say you are 'dismissed' (an action taken and decided already) it means you are being suspended temporarily or effectively sacked or fired - made redundant. 'Dismissed' as per dictionary and use of English may be referred either to one or more than one person. If I 'dismissed' his argument as fallacious - it means I would not consider his/her opinions.

  • "Dismissed " in a class room or a at a police briefing means "You may leave, we are finished" – mplungjan May 21 '18 at 15:34

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