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It doesn't matter what obstacles you face in life, Sarah, and no matter what, you've got to reach your goals.

I added 'and no matter what' as it considered a comma splice without it- although when you read it out it sounds fine.

It doesn't matter what obstacles you face in life, Sarah, you've got to reach your goals.

Use a pair of bracketing commas to set off a weak interruption which could be removed from the sentence without destroying it.

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The sentence you wrote does have a comma splice but it's not from the phrase you highlighted. Let's start with your simplified sentence:

It doesn't matter what obstacles you face in life, Sarah, you've got to reach your goals.

There are two separate, full sentence in there that you just glued together with a comma. That is a comma splice. One of these would be okay:

It doesn't matter what obstacles you face in life, Sarah. You've got to reach your goals.

It doesn't matter what obstacles you face in life, Sarah: you've got to reach your goals.

Sarah can end up in either sentence as long as you separate the name out with a comma.

Your first sentence still suffers from the same issue. "No matter what" complicates this a bit more because, firstly, it's an afterthought (not part of the sentence's main flow) and, secondly, "no matter what" seems redundant. If you are quoting spoken speech, you could separate it out with m-dash. If it's something you want to write, you could follow a more formal structure like:

No matter what happens or what obstacles you face in life, Sarah, you've got to reach your goals.

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