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  1. The user is logged in.
  2. The user is logged-in.

Are both of these sentences correct? In the first sentence, is logged in a participial adjective? If it's not, what is it called and how is it related to the verb is?

Thanks!

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    The second one is incorrect. We only use the hyphenated form before a noun, like "the logged-in user".
    – stangdon
    Commented May 24, 2018 at 15:20
  • Thanks, in the first sentence, is logged in still an adjective? Commented May 25, 2018 at 10:43

1 Answer 1

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As stangdon says, the hyphenated form is an adjective usually placed before the noun:

Logged-in users have privileges based on their assigned role.

Otherwise, as in your first sentence, don't hyphenate:

When users are first logged in, they are assigned a specific role.

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  • Thanks, in the first sentence that I wrote, is logged in still an adjective? Commented May 25, 2018 at 15:04
  • @user1764381 it would probably be classified as a participle that acts like an adjective, similar to "the bread is toasted"
    – Andrew
    Commented May 25, 2018 at 15:13

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