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This is the next question about the same song I asked short time ago.

1:37~ She sings "I don't feature what you are putting down."

I took "putting down" as "something written".

So would that mean, "I don't appreciate (or not be impressed) by what you wrote"?

And does she have some dialectic tone?

I am sorry I didn't know this is Mandy Moore's song. And here is the lyric of the song. ( I raised the part of the lyric so that people may be able to see much more clearly. )

Stupid Cupid, you're a real mean guy
I'd like to clip your wings so you can't fly
I am in love and it's a crying shame
And I know that you're the one to blame
Hey hey, set me free
Stupid Cupid, stop picking on me
Can't do my homework and I can't think straight
I meet him every morning at 'bout half past eight
I'm acting like a lovesick fool
You've even got me carrying his books to school
Hey hey, set me free
Stupid Cupid, stop picking on me
You mixed me up for good
Right from the very start
Hey, go play Robin Hood
With somebody else's heart
You got me jumping like a crazy clown
And I don't feature what your puttin' down
Since I kissed his loving lips of wine
The thing that bothers me is that I like it fine
Hey hey, set me free
Stupid Cupid, stop picking on me
You got me jumping like a crazy clown
And I don't feature what your puttin' down
Since I kissed his loving lips of wine
The thing that bothers me is that I like it fine
Hey hey, set me free
Stupid Cupid, stop picking on me
Hey hey, set me free
Stupid Cupid, stop picking on me

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    Can you link to a lyrics page rather than the video? I'd rather not go to Youtube to see what the full lyrics of the song are and you don't even state the title in your question. Please include the necessary details for us! – Catija May 24 '18 at 20:15
  • @Catija Lyrics are in the video description. – alanj May 24 '18 at 20:36
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"Putting down" in this case is referring to how somebody is acting. But it's uncommon to use it that way in everyday speech. It's a bit strange to use the word "Feature" in this manner as well. This lyric could be simply interpreted as I don't like how you're acting.

But be careful in using "Putting down" as it can have many different meanings depending on context. You're correct to think it means something written.

Let's put this in writing so it's official.

or

Let me jot down a grocery list so I don't forget.

To put down a pet means to euthanize it.

My dog got sick and I had to put him down.

To put down for a nap usually means to put a baby in a crib for a nap.

I put Alice down for a nap 20 minutes ago and she's still asleep.

It could be slang for "Do you understand what I'm saying?"

Are you picking up what I'm putting down?

This one is also very uncommon.

  • Thanks. The agony was, not actually more about "putting down" but rather the verb "feature". I stopped completely there. Thank you. – Kentaro Tomono May 24 '18 at 20:50
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    +1. Just wanted to mention though that I think you left out one very common meaning of put down, which would be to disparage someone. – joiedevivre May 24 '18 at 21:20
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This question is about a very ambiguous statement that is open to interpretation, but my reading of this, in context, is quite different from the other answer. I get something like this out of it:

I don't want to focus on romantic love in my life, but stupid cupid is making me do it, anyway.

It's unusual to use the verb "feature" this way, but if I said something like "I don't feature exercise in my life," I would mean it was something I didn't do much, didn't like, or didn't want to focus on.

What is meant by "puttin' down" is even more problematic, but I don't think it's totally out of the ballpark to read it as some sort of force or coercion, sort of akin to "laying down the law."

Anyway, that doesn't invalidate the other answer. Ultimately, I don't think there is any really clear answer about what this means, unless Mandy Moore has one.

  • Thank you for your own answer. I am afraid I don't understand about the part "I don't feature exercise".... – Kentaro Tomono May 24 '18 at 22:20
  • Hm. To help you understand that, I would need to get a sense of what you understand about "feature" when it is used as a verb. Do you understand, for example: This movie features a lot of gore? – joiedevivre May 24 '18 at 22:22
  • Would that mean "This" feature gives special attention to the scene full of blood? on the ground that gore means blood? – Kentaro Tomono May 24 '18 at 22:31
  • Sort of. It would mean that the movie probably has a lot of scenes with vivid depictions of violence. However, it further implies that the movie is treating gore as a positive or artistic thing, focusing on it, and treating it as a selling point of the movie. Does that help at all to understand what it might mean to "feature" exercise (or love) in your life? Like I say, though, this usage in the song is very strange, no matter how you look at it. Even as a native English speaker, I'm just making wild guesses. – joiedevivre May 24 '18 at 22:55
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    This is an American slang usage of "feature", meaning "approve of"; see here. – JW. May 25 '18 at 3:40

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