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Hello as always thank you for your constant support from the bottom of my heart.

I happened to be reading an article about a basketball player in Lithuania, and encountered naive phrase which I wrote at the title.

He is saying...

I’m huge on being a true team player,” Ball told Yahoo Sports. “I feel if you bond good with the people you play with, you will be successful. I made it a point to get to know my teammates in Lithuania, and to try to win together.

I feel somewhat ( personally ) the raised part of his speech is redundant.

make it a point to get to know my teammates in Lithuania?

Could that mean or could it be better to say "I tried to get to know my teammates in Lithuania better"?

Thank you for your support.

Sincerely


Thank you for your comments. I didn't know with shame that "make it a point to do something" is an idiom. ( but does adding "to get to know after that sound a bit "colossal" ? ) Thank you anyway. Solved.

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    In conversations and interviews, people don't speak in neat, well-phrased, grammatical sentences. Although you could improve Ball's grammar as a grammatical exercise, you can't change the way people talk to one another. May 25, 2018 at 11:16
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    it's 100% idiomatic to say: to make it a point to do something. However, bond good would sound better as to bond closely. Bond good is slightly marked as uneducated....
    – Lambie
    May 25, 2018 at 11:18
  • Thank you guys. As I edited, I didn't know it was an idiom. But, as I am saying, to put "to get to know" sounds a bit...not smart to me...
    – user17814
    May 25, 2018 at 11:28
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    Cambridge defines "to get to know sb/sth" as "to spend time with someone or something so that you gradually learn more about him, her, or it". Apart from the "bond good", which should have been "bond well", I don't see any other issues. Why do you think the bolded text is redundant?
    – urnonav
    May 25, 2018 at 12:10
  • Because, "to make it a point to do something" means link[merriam-webster.com/dictionary/… to to give one's attention to make sure that it happens. I personally think "to make sure" "to get to know" would be a bit not smart.But thank you.
    – user17814
    May 25, 2018 at 12:16

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I don't see any redundancy in the sentence you have bolded:

I made it a point to get to know my teammates in Lithuania, and to try to win together.

To "make it a point" do do something is to be very deliberate in regard to it, to make sure that you do indeed accomplish it.

I made it a point to warn him that the fuel tank was nearly empty, so that he would not take the boat out on the lake without filling the tank first.

In your quote, the speaker was intent on becoming well acquainted with his teammates and made the necessary efforts to become well acquainted with them and ultimately did become well acquainted with them.

Your suggested improvement, I tried..., does not capture the meaning of the phrase. These two sentences mean very different things:

I tried to warn him that the fuel tank was nearly empty.

I made it a point to warn him that the fuel tank was nearly empty.

In the second, the meaning is that warning did indeed occur. In the first, the meaning is that the warning may not have been delivered, or that it might not have fully registered on the person who was warned. The verb try does not convey the idea of ensuring that the thing takes place which is integral to the meaning of make it a point to do something.

P.S. In response to your comments below....

When we say he made sure to do it (past tense) the meaning is that X did indeed occur. He did X. But if we say to someone Make sure to lock the door before you leave! (imperative mood) and that person replies OK, I will make sure to lock the door before I leave (future), we are speaking not about what has happened but about what must happen and about what will happen. The past tense made sure in a declarative sentence indicates that the thing was done.

-- I made sure to do it.

-- I made it a point to do it.

I was very deliberate and I saw the action through.

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  • >In the second, the meaning is that warning did indeed occur. First of all, I am not a native speaker. Sorry. Okay then, try may might not be a good verb here, but actually, even though if I use the very "try", I can not see so much clear distinction. Sorry. I would like to hear the advice from Ronald Sole. Anyway, thank you.
    – user17814
    May 25, 2018 at 13:19
  • And I didn't suggest improvement. Please do not get me wrong.
    – user17814
    May 25, 2018 at 13:21
  • OK, you asked whether your sentence with tried would be better.
    – TimR
    May 25, 2018 at 13:26
  • You do not see a clear distinction between an attempt to do something, and doing something?
    – TimR
    May 25, 2018 at 13:27
  • I asked if the verb try might be better personally.
    – user17814
    May 25, 2018 at 13:27

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