0

Which of the following sentences is correct? And what is the striking contrast among them?

1) The richer you are , the happier you can be.

2) The richer you are, the happier you will be.

3) The richer you are, the happier you are.

1
  • What makes you think any of them is incorrect? And what do you think the contrast is? Without more detail this question will likely be closed. – Andrew May 25 '18 at 14:52
0

Modal can refers to a strong likelihood as distinct from the definite. The definite is expressed by will be and are.

The darker it gets, the harder it can be to see.

The darker it gets, the harder it {is|will be} to see.

The difference between those two sentences is subtle. The first, with can, states that darkness makes it harder to see if not in all cases then in most cases: as a "rule of thumb", darkness makes it harder to see; the evidence is not in doubt but it falls shy of making an absolute statement. The second, with is and will be, is a starker statement: darkness makes it harder to see. The modal will emphasizes the result or outcome that flows from the fact, in this kind of construction.

-1

All of them are correct, depending on the message that you want to convey:

The richer you are , the happier you can be.

It means that the level of your general happiness potential depends on your richness now or generally.

The richer you are, the happier you will be.

Unlike the previous one (using the modal verb "can") It means that the level of your happiness in the future depends on your richness now or generally.

The richer you are, the happier you are.

Unlike the previous two (using in can and will), this one means that the level of your happiness generally depends on your richness generally.

2
  • -1. I downvoted because the present tense here refers to a general state of affairs, not to the present moment. The richer you are at any time... – Tᴚoɯɐuo May 25 '18 at 16:21
  • Thank you for your note. Let me know if I have other mistakes to correct and I'll do it happily. – Judicious Allure May 25 '18 at 16:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.