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Is there any difference between these three sentences? If yes, what is it?

1) I so wish to make my parents proud of me someday.

2) I so hope to make my parents proud of me someday.

3) I so want to make my parents proud of me someday.

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Let's review each sentence.

First, the word "so" is being used as an intensifier, however "really" would fit much better in this context.

I really hope to make my parents proud of me someday.

Great.

I really want to make my parents proud of me someday.

Yes, that is fine. ("Hope" sounds more nice or literary or something. "Want" is more common and basic. But that can be good also.)

I really wish to make my parents proud of me someday.

Of course, this sentence makes sense. But it doesn't quite sound idiomatic, or like standard common spoken English.

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Well, there is a slight difference between the three sentences.

The first one I so wish to make my parents proud of me someday. suggests that it is your wish to make your parents proud of you which means that at present you don't know if you are capable of doing that or not, or if you would ever be able to do that or not, but you wish to.

The second sentence I so hope to make my parents proud of me someday. suggests that you are probably working towards making them feel proud of you and are hopeful that you will be able to achieve it.

The third sentence I so want to make my parents proud of me someday. is very similar to the first one in meaning. It's just that want is a stronger emotion than wish. When you want something, you are not being polite, you are sort of demanding it.

For example - I want you complete this assignment means that the second person does not have a choice; you want it; you are demanding it from him. But I wish you to complete this assignment means that it is just your wish for the second person to complete the assignment and he/she still can refuse it.

A better example to understand the difference would be -

I wish I pass the exams. - It's almost like you are praying to someone and telling your wish.

I know I couldn't work as hard as needed but I hope I pass the exams. - It means you have been working towards the exams (so what if it wasn't enough according to you, you worked) and so, you are hoping and not merely wishing for it

I want to pass the exams but not by cheating - It reflects a resolution on your part. You are willing to do something in order to pass the exam and you are telling someone that it can be anything but cheating (so maybe you are willing to work hard because you want it, not just wish for it)

Once again, the differences are minute and in day to day language these distinctions are not made quite often.

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