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In what forms of training do you participate [in/to]?

Should I end that sentence with "in" or "to"? If I add "in" at the end, should I cut the "in" at the beginning?

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Better to keep it at the beginning and forget about it at the end. People will argue with this, but I still think it sounds better not to end a sentence on a preposition if it can be avoided.

  • Do you mean it should be "in what forms of training do you participate"? – Alexander Troup Jan 30 '14 at 16:14
  • @Alexander Troup Perfect! – WS2 Jan 30 '14 at 16:42
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It is to participate in sth. But when you begin a question with "In what forms of training do you participate? - then your sentence is complete. A further preposition at the end of the sentence is simply wrong.

  • Just so. A further preposition at the end of a sentence is an aberration up with which we will not put. :) – BobRodes Jan 30 '14 at 19:53
  • @Bob: Did you mean "an aberration up with which we will not put up"? :-) – Peter Shor Jan 31 '14 at 4:16
  • Nope, don't believe so. That would suggest the alternative "an aberration we will not put up up with." – BobRodes Feb 4 '14 at 16:24
  • This reminds me of the humorous caveat, 'Never use a preposition to end a sentence with.' But, seriously, don't end a sentence with a preposition if you can reword the sentence smoothly, using another syntax. – JimM Nov 15 '14 at 20:49

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