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When I read the definition of the "verb" in Oxford dictionary, that's what I found:

Verb: a word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence, and forming the main part of the predicate of a sentence, such as hear, become, happen.

The way that intuitively I would write the same thing was:

a word that is used to describe an action, state, or occurrence, and forming the main part of the predicate of a sentence, such as hear, become, happen.

Then my question is when and why we can or we should omit such copula (linking verb) from a sentence? (As a English learner who 'follows the book' and put always the linking verbs in such cases I don't have yet the privilege to economy verbs and say what necessary to say only without to be wordy, that's why I'm looking for a rule or something like that to make me closer to the native English speakers)

0

As a native English speaker, I would say "a word that is used to". "A word used to" is a bit formal. I believe that in "a word used to", "used" is also a linking verb and that is why the two sentences have equivalent meaning.

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