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The verb "take" has many meanings and I cannot understand the meaning of "take" in the text below.

I stood outside the bishop’s office on a cold night in February. I didn’t know what had taken me there.

Could you please tell me what the meaning of "take" here is?

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Your sentence;

I didn’t know what had taken me there.

Although there's a difference of perspective between take and bring I'd paraphrase it as:

I didn’t know what had brought me there.

See usage note of bring, which says:

Bring indicates motion toward the place from which the action is regarded—typically toward the speaker—while take indicates motion away from the place from which the action is regarded—typically away from the speaker. Thus from a customer's perspective, the customer takes checks to the bank and brings home cash, while from the banker's perspective the customer brings checks to the bank in order to take away cash. When the point of reference is not the place of speaking itself, either verb is possible, but the correct choice still depends on the desired perspective.

12

I don't know what caused me to go to that place.

15 a : to lead, carry, or cause to go along to another place

Take (Merriam-Webster)

My wanderings took me to Waterstones Trafalgar Square, where I had my very first UK book signing in 2000 for my very first book

My wanderings took me to a place near the Sacred Rock.

My wanderings took me to the Folkmoot Friendship Center

Today, my wanderings took me to Embo

  • Or perhaps motivated, in place of caused. – Tim Jun 3 '18 at 1:25

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