1

I wrote the following sentence for my IELTS essay and my teacher said that although and yet have similar meanings. My sentences is:

Although there are many advantages to online education yet I strongly believe that regular courses are much better.

Is it wrong to use yet and although together? What other ways to write the sentence are there?

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Jun 2 '18 at 9:35

This question came from our site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts.

1

I advise looking at the link given in Lawrence's comment even though that link completely fails to emphasize a key distinction between what is grammatical and what is considered good modern style.

Although ... yet is grammatical and idiomatic. You will be understood if you use that construction. Moreover, the link indicates that respected and important writers like Locke have used the construction. Locke, however, wrote about three hundred years ago.

Modern style tends to be concise. The yet in although ... yet is logically redundant, and thus is not as concise as modern stylists recommend. Nevertheless, the yet may act as an intensifier, and no stylist will eliminate intensifiers from discourse. The stylistic problem with using although ... yet as an intensifier is that is currently uncommon and so sounds odd. The modern way to make that intensification is with even though.

  • .You are right.I have seen Although and yet in the same sentence in some grammar books.I have upvoted your answer – Englishmonger Sep 14 at 9:00
0

The sentence presented by the OP isn't grammatical.

According to The Free dictionary, "when you begin a sentence with although or though, don't use but or yet to introduce the main clause. For example: Although he was late, yet he stopped to buy a sandwitch. You say: Although he was late, he stopped to buy a sandwitch".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy