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I am asking about this phrase:

"It's based on .Net Framework 2.0 for more versatility”

I’m not sure which one is the best way to say something like this, and also I'm not sure this community is related to this topic or not. Maybe some computer programming knowledge is required to understand what I looking for.

First issue is that I don't know can I say "based on .Net framework 2" or I have to say "is targeted on .Net framework 2"

Second one is about "Versatility". I didn't use this word before, is it correct in this sentence? should I use "more" before it?

  • "Target" is the technical term Microsoft normally uses, but unlike some jargon, it's still practical to use plain English for similar meanings. – Nathan Tuggy Jun 3 '18 at 21:39
  • @Nathan Tuggy Yes, You're right – Rmanaf Jun 4 '18 at 0:09
  • The phrase for more versatility glosses over the specific type of advantage here, which relates to deployment, I think, unless there were useful features in an earlier version which were removed in subsequent ones. If easier deployment is the only advantage, then versatility is not an optimal description, though it may be perfectly fine from a marketing point-of-view. Your software may make all our dreams come true. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 4 '18 at 17:19
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"based on" sounds understandable to me, although as a programmer I would prefer something more technical like "It's targeting..."

Also, I would like to use a "the" in there, like:

It's targeting the .Net 2.0 Framework for more versatility.

I, at least, think of ".Net 2.0 Framework" as a specific thing and therefore it needs a definite article otherwise it sounds odd.

"more versatility" sounds perfectly fine to me. Just "versatility" works as well, but it sounds a bit awkward to me.

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To me it sounds little bit out of a context. Anyway, I would recommend

based on

About versatility, I can say that more versatility is fine. You can use it.

But as I said, it sounds little bit odd. I would use something like

For more versatile solution, I would recommend to use .Net Framework 2.0.

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