1

Let's say you are describing a house. And you say:

As you enter towards the 2-storey house, there is a cobblestoned pathway which makes your walk easier.

Is this the same as:

While you are entering towards the 2-storey house, there is a cobblestoned pathway which makes your walk easier.

Are they the same? Googling doesn't have any result in this query unfortunately.

(Edited)

  • As you enter the 2-story house, there is a cobblestone pathway which makes your walk easier.
  • While you approach the 2-story house, a cobblestone pathway before the house will make your walk easier.
  • 1
    Entering toward? That's strange! Or it has some premises where we enter toward the house! – Maulik V Jun 4 '18 at 8:46
  • Oh yeah, I forgot that when we use ''enter'' thx. – John Arvin Jun 4 '18 at 11:40
  • I have just edited it, is that ok now? – John Arvin Jun 4 '18 at 11:56
2

Ok first of all..

"As you enter towards the 2-storey house..."

..is incorrect. You don't "enter towards". Entering and exiting already indicate a direction, so there is no need to add any further direction.

You would simply say:

"As you enter the 2-storey house..."

"Entering" is the action of going inside. As for the different between enter and entering - the latter is ongoing. Just how long does it take you to enter a house? If you literally just step through a door then nothing much is going to happen "while you are entering".

I don't think there are many cobblestone paths actually leading into houses, so I'm guessing you don't meant to say entering.

I think you mean to say:

"As you approach the 2-storey house there is a cobblestone pathway which makes your walk easier.

or

Before you enter the 2-storey house, there is a cobblestone pathway which makes your walk easier.

or, if there was some land around the house you could say:

As you enter the property there is a cobblestone pathway which makes your walk towards 2-storey house easier.

Lastly, you would normally say "cobblestone pathway", not "cobblestoned". It is a path made of cobblestone. You wouldn't say a "wooded door" or a "glassed window".


RE: your edit

Since my original answer you have re-written the following two sentences:

As you enter the 2-story house, there is a cobblestone pathway which makes your walk easier.

As previously stated I don't think the cobblestone pathway is "as you enter the house". The cobblestone path will likely stop before the door leading to the house. You walk along the cobblestone path as you approach the house.

While you approach the 2-story house, a cobblestone pathway before the house will make your walk easier.

Again, no. "While" is not correct here. You use "while" to show that two things are happening at the same time. For example "whistle while you work" - you can stop whistling and stop working, but the cobblestone path isn't an event that happens.

  • Please see the latest part if that is ok now... thx. – John Arvin Jun 4 '18 at 11:58
  • @JohnArvin I don't fully understand your edit, but I have attempted to address it. – Astralbee Jun 4 '18 at 13:20
  • Ok I get it now. Both bold letters are wrong that need to be changed from as you enter into before you enter, whereas, the second sentence should be ditched. – John Arvin Jun 4 '18 at 17:14
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(1) How do you "enter towards"? If you are going "towards" a house, then you cannot also be entering the house. It is this part that sounds really strange to me, a native English speaker in the US.

Based on context, I will suppose the you are really entering a gate of some sort, and in the process going/coming towards the house. If so, I would say "As you enter a gate, towards..." instead.

(2) "As you enter..." / "While you are entering..." mean the same thing... mostly.

If tell of you entering a yard and a thing (like a dog) happens to be there right then... I would normally say "while you are entering..." or "as you are entering...".

If tell of you entering a yard and a thing (like a stone pathway) is always there, day or night... then I would normally say "as you enter...". So in this context "as you enter" sounds better to me.

0

Yes, both means the same and can be used with both simple and progressive forms. However, "while" is more common in using progressive forms than "as" because "as" has several other meanings as well. For example, as can be used to show the reason. Example: As I was busy doing my homework, she went to the shop herself (it is reason).

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