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"What does she stay is stopping us from doing this?"

Should the sentence from BBC be as follows.

  • What she stays is stopping us from doing this

Is my understanding correct?

  • Maybe they want to say "what doe she stay" is stopping us from doing something. I mean that question is impeding them. – Cardinal Jun 5 '18 at 1:00
  • What does she stay or What does she say? "Stay" makes no sense. – Andrew Jun 5 '18 at 1:56
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What does she say is stopping us from doing this? 

What she says is stopping us from doing this. 

These are two different sentences with two different meanings -- so different that only the first should be regarded as a question.  The second is a statement with a vaguely described subject. 

 

Let's look at the first one first: 

What does she say is stopping us from doing this? 

She says that something is stopping us from doing this.  What is that something? 

This is a question.  The first word is an interrogative pronoun, representing the heart of the question.  The second word is a verb, the auxiliary "do" commonly found in simple questions like these. 

 

Next, the next: 

What she says is stopping us from doing this. 

She says something.  That something is stopping us from doing this. 

This "what" looks no different than the interrogative "what" in the earlier sentence.  However, it can't be the heart of the question because no question follows it.  The second word is a pronoun, which in this sentence serves as the subject of a subordinate clause.  This pattern does not resemble a question at all.  Instead, the entire subordinate clause "what she says" serves as the subject of the matrix clause. 

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