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The sentence is:

To solve a complex problem, there is always a simple way which everyone can understand.

Do you think that this sentence is grammatically OK?

Why I am asking it is because I would like to put "to solve.." after "a simple way" but it is really confusing.

There is always a simple way to solve a complex problem, which everyone can understand.

I think it is really confusing so the first one is better.

Do you agree?

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Both versions of the sentence are grammatically correct. The change in grammatical structure changes the meaning of the sentence.

My first impression of the first example is that "everyone can understand" the "simple way".

My first impression of the second example is not that "everyone can understand" the "simple way". Instead, my impression is that "everyone can understand" the (claimed) "fact" that "[t]here is always a simple way to solve a complex problem".

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  • Totally agree with you. So we can say that the first one is grammatically correct, can't we? – Jawel Jun 8 '18 at 20:00
  • Both are grammatically correct. – danch Jun 8 '18 at 20:15
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Your second sentence flows better.

There is always a simple way to solve a complex problem, which everyone can understand.

I offer

Everyone can understand the simple solution to a complex problem.

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