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Question 1:

Not most people like him.

Not most of them are good looking.

As far as I know, before the words like "many", "a lot", "some" and "every", we can use the word "not" for not causing any ambiguity depending on what we want to mean. I think we can use it before "most" too. Am I right? Are these two sentences above correct?

Question 2:

Can I also say these:

Not most of the time I play video games.

I play video games not most of the time.

I think the sentences in question 1 are correct but I feel like these two here are wrong. I think I have to say "I don't play video games most of the time" even if I play video games quite often (quite often but not most of the time), am I right?

EDIT: In the first question, I mean "Not most people do like him". What In t I mean by saying it is not "Most people do not like him.". I mean, there can be many people who like him, but not most people like him. For example, 50% of people might like him and that's a lot, but that's not most people. If I say "Most people don't like him" for describing this situation, it is wrong because %50 doesn't count as most people. But, John Lawler said that it was wrong to say "Not most people...". So, I don't know what to do

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    Not many/much/all/every/a lot are idiomatic negative quantifiers. They don't inflect for comparative and superlative, because negative terms almost always have different grammar rules from ordinary terms. So that means you're wrong -- *not most does not occur as a quantifier (i.e, at the beginning or a noun phrase). The sequence not and most can occur in a verb phrase if most occurs at the beginning of a complement phrase after a negative auxiliary, as in The political infighting was not most of it; the accounting software itself caused the problem. – John Lawler Jun 9 '18 at 18:05
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    Your first sentence is ambiguous Not most people like him. Do you mean: 1) Most people do not like him. or 2) Most people are not similar to him. – Peter Jun 9 '18 at 19:58
  • @Peter I mean "Not most people do like him" What I mean by saying it is not "Most people do not like him.". I mean, there can be many people who like him, but not most people like him. For example, 50% of people might like him and that's a lot, but that's not most people. If I say "Most people don't like him" for describing this situation, it is wrong because %50 doesn't count as most people. But, John Lawler said that it was wrong to say "Not most people...". So, I don't know what to do. – Fire and Ice Jun 9 '18 at 23:57
  • @DereMemo Not most people = less than most = some people, Most natives would say "Some people do not like him." They would not use your "not most people" construction. – Peter Jun 10 '18 at 3:18
  • @Peter Do you agree with that "Not most people" is grammatically wrong? – Fire and Ice Jun 10 '18 at 11:45

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