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I came across a sentence in a novel:

You have a concussion and are more use to the Navy with a working brain than without, plus you're 'bout as dinged up as that ship is. Look at your shoulder. (The Beautiful Mistake, by Steve Zingerman)

I thought are more use to reads strange to me, because be of more use to is a more common expression.

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Your two examples have very different meanings

You have a concussion and are more use to the Navy with a working brain than without

has the meaning,

you have a disability, but are more familiar with dealing with the Navy without your disability.

the perspective is how you deal with the Navy, where as

You have a concussion and would be of more use to the Navy with a working brain than without

has the meaning of your usefulness to the Navy.

  • Shouldn't that first one be used to, not use to? – J.R. Jun 10 '18 at 9:31

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