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I don"t know the difference between "I'm sorry (that) S+V" and "I'm sad (that) S+V".

For example,

  • I'm sorry I went.
  • I'm sad I went.
  • I'm sorry you're not going to come.
  • I'm sad you're not going to come.

Would you explain the difference to me?

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    Hello, have you checked the two in a dictionary? What's the difference between being sad and sorry? – Cardinal Jun 11 '18 at 13:45
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    You might want to use going to. And it's explain the difference to me, just for your information. Sad and sorry are different words and probably exist in your own language, too. – Lambie Jun 11 '18 at 14:28
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"Sad" is an emotion while "sorry" is apologetic; however we can also say we are "sad" as a way to apologize for something.

I'm sorry I forgot your birthday (I apologize that I forgot)

I'm sad I forgot your birthday (I feel bad that I forgot your birthday, by which you should understand that I'm also sorry)

Or we can say we feel "sorry" to imply that some action has us feeling "sad".

I'm sad to hear about the loss of your father. He was such a nice man. (I feel bad that your father died, by which you should understand that I sympathize with you.)

I'm sorry to hear about the loss of your father. He was such a nice man. (I feel bad that your father died, and I'm offering sympathy)

So much depends on the context. However, I think almost every language uses emotions to convey messages. Nor is it limited to just sad/sorry:

I was happy to hear that you graduated from college! (I'm offering congratulations)

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