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Is it better to use "she", "he" or both can be right?

I'll trap my heart (...) / So it won't find a way to love again / 'Cause when it does, it hurts too deep / For all it wants and never finds is a love it can keep.

It (is supposed) to be a poem, but I'm having a hard time deciding if replacing the "it"s for he/she is appropriate or not.

  • What is the context? Of you are talking about a specific person then you would use the appropriate pronoun for that person. – Andrew Jun 12 '18 at 4:50
  • The heart is an it, e.g. the heart wants what it wants. The suitability of any gendered personification will be highly dependent on context. – choster Jun 12 '18 at 5:20
  • I'll trap my heart (...) / So it won't find a way to love again / 'Cause when it does, it hurts too deep / For all it wants and never finds is a love it can keep. It (is supposed) to be a poem, but english is not my native language, so I'm having a hard time deciding if replacing the "it"s for he/she is appropriate or not. – user76679 Jun 12 '18 at 5:34
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If you're anthropomorphizing the heart (treating it as an imaginary person), either would probably work. English doesn't have a very strong convention in general for which gender things should be considered if they don't biologically have sexes. (There are exceptions, mostly for things like vehicles and countries, and most deities are person-like enough to be considered to have a gender whether or not they have any physical or metaphysical sex.)

Really, though, it's usually going to be best to just treat the heart as the object it is and use the impersonal pronoun "it". And in the particular context given in the question, there's nothing wrong with "it" and it's unlikely that either "he" or "she" would make any sense.

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I agree with Nathan for the technical bit (and have stolen it)

English doesn't have a very strong convention in general for which gender things should be considered if they don't biologically have sexes. (There are exceptions, mostly for things like vehicles and countries, and most deities are person-like enough to be considered to have a gender whether or not they have any physical or metaphysical sex.)

but I disagree with his conclusion.

I think choosing whichever sexed pronouns you like will work.

As you say "I trap my heart" make it the same sex as you, but this is all stylistic advice.

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