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I just joined StackExchange and here's my first grammar question:

Is my use of full throttle in the following sentence correct?

She has a paper due tomorrow and is working "full throttle" on it.

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    Yes, you are using that idiom correctly. The preposition "at" is sometimes added to the front, i.e. "at full throttle", but it is not a requirement. – James Jun 13 '18 at 0:26
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She has a paper due tomorrow and is working "full throttle" on it

There is nothing grammatically wrong, but it might be better to write

She has a paper due tomorrow and is working full-throttle on it

or

She has a paper due tomorrow and is working at full throttle on it

Using "full-throttle" as an adverb (which is what you are doing here) is a little sketchy, and I think the hyphen improves it.

Using the preposition phrase "at full throttle" makes the thing perfectly clear.

I don't think the quotation marks added anything of value.

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  • Thanks.I used the quotation marks to put emphasis on the part of the sentence I was referring to.. – GrammarBoy Jun 13 '18 at 7:56
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    I don't think the hyphen is needed here. Here is an example of full throttle that I found on Google books, and which is exactly the way I used it: "The men were working full throttle to get the corn and beans harvested." – GrammarBoy Jun 13 '18 at 8:05
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    That hyphen looks awkward to me. Expressions like full throttle and full speed are common enough that I think it's best to omit the hyphen. @GrammarBoy - You probably shouldn't use quotation marks for "emphasis." They look like scare quotes, and I would interpret that to mean that they were being lazy, and not truly working with a full effort. – J.R. Jun 13 '18 at 9:44

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