2

Could you tell me which one is correct and the meaning of each sentence:

  1. Yesterday, I went to the place you had recommended.
  2. I went to the place you had recommended yesterday.
  3. I went to the place yesterday which you had recommended.
2

The first sentence is grammatically correct and it means:

You had recommended a place. I went to that place yesterday.

The second one is grammatically correct and it can theoretically mean two different meanings. The most likely meaning is:

You had recommended a place yesterday. I went there(When? It's not sure).

The other meaning is the same as the first one. However, this meaning is very unlikely.(But theoretically possible)

The third one is grammatically not good. You should not separate a noun from its relative clause referring to it.

"Yesterday" separates the noun "the place" from its relative clause "which you had recommended". So you can put it somewhere else.

  • 1
    +1, but #3 is not ungrammatical. You hear it a lot from the mouths of native speakers, though perhaps not with the past perfect, and often without which. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 13 '18 at 22:40
  • You can also hear grammatical errors from the mouths of native speakers, so the fact that something came from the mouth of a native speaker doesn't make it good grammar yet. (For example, I see many people writing "their" instead of "they're" or even "there" – does it make it correct grammar? I hope not.) – SasQ Mar 28 at 6:54
1

Most likely you want to go with the first sentence.

Yesterday, I went to the place you had recommended.

You can even remove "had"

Yesterday, I went to the place you recommended.

The second sentence indicates that the recommendation is what took place yesterday, so when you went to the place is somewhat ambiguous.

The third sentence has a weird construction which seems to indicate that the recommendation was to go to the place, specifically yesterday.

eg: You had better go to the place tomorrow since they're having a big one-day sale.

1

(1) Yesterday, I went to the place you had recommended.

(2) I went to the place you had recommended yesterday.

(3) I went to the place yesterday which you had recommended.

Grammatically, they are all acceptable, though it's not clear why the preterite perfect tense is used here in the subordinate clauses.

Semantically, in (1) and (3) "yesterday" denotes when you went to the place that you had at some unspecified previous time been recommended.

(2) is strictly speaking ambiguous as to whether "yesterday" denotes when you went to the place, or when it had been recommended.

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