0

Please explain me the difference between these two conversations:

What will you do first?
I will send you that Report.

and

What you do first?
I send you that Report.


I took a look at the original question of the OP. I'm thinking that the OP might want to express his thought in one single sentence. The following is what the OP wrote, reformatted only minimally.

Please explain me the meaning of below sentence.

What will i do first, i will send you that Report.

and

What i do first, i send you that Report.

I mean to say i am going to send you Report in few minutes.

Does it any mean difference?

  • 1
    It will be difficult to give you a proper answer if you do not add some punctuation to your text. This remark notwithstanding that "I" (first person singular) is always capitalized. – Laure Feb 3 '14 at 8:28
1

If you want to say "I am going to send you the report in a few minutes," I recommend you to just say it.

I am going to send you the report in a few minutes.

However, it seems to me you want to emphasize that you will send that report before doing anything else. Both of your sentences sound rather odd. As a listener, I wasn't sure you wanted to ask a question or you wanted to tell me what you're about to do.

There are many possible ways to rephrase it. For example,

*What will i do first, i will send you that Report.
What I will do first is (that) I will send you that report.

*What i do first, i send you that Report.
What I'm going to do first is to send you that report.

I also recommend reading about English tenses, and how to make questions in grammar books. You can always come back here to ask more questions like this on ELL.

0

With reference to my interpretation of OP's context, there are two situations being referred. These include with the use of "will" and without it.

"What will you do first? "I will send you that Report."

and

What you do first? I send you that Report?

In the first case you are taking about the future - due to will being used. The asker asks what would you do first, and you answer that you'd submit the report.

In the second example you are using Present Simple Tense, which is used to express habitual or usual actions that may be of daily event occurrences or universal facts. So, you are asked what you do first, and you answer that you submit the report - implying that this is a regular practice.

Example of Present Simple Tense:

"Sun rises in the East"

0

I take it that what you are asking may be a little more clearly expressed by providing speech headings:

Please explain me the difference between these two conversations:
A

Q: What will you do first?
R: I will send you that Report.

B

Q: What you do first?
R: I send you that Report.

If this is the case, then we have to start by oberving that the question in B is ungrammatical. Questions headed by a Wh- interrogative require an auxiliary verb in the second position, thus:

B2

Q: What do you do first?
R: I send you that Report.

The difference between A and B2 is that they ask different questions and occur in different contexts.

  • A employs the modal auxiliary will to ask about R&squo;s intention for the future. Here it is with a little additional context:

    Q: R, you have a lot of tasks on your list. What will you do first?
    R: First I will send you that Report, which you need urgently; then I will work my way through the rest of the list.

  • B employs the simple present to ask about R&squo;s habitual, repeated actions—for instance, about office routine:

    Q: R, I’m new here and I’m not clear on how we handle situations like this. What do you do first?
    R: First I send you that Report we were just talking about. When you have read it you may take action yourself, or if you think the matter is very serious you may call a meeting of the Discipline Committee to discuss it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.