2

Stoic Physics, in the premises, is a natural Philosophy in terms whereof an attempt is made to understand and describe the natural processes of divine reason or logos which are at work in the Universe.

[Stoicism a beginners guide to the history philosophy of stoicism]

What does "in the premises" mean? I think it means "in what has been said before". Is it correct?

I also don't understand the use of "in terms whereof". Could you explain this to me!

Thanks!

  • "In terms whereof" could be like "in terms of which/what", I figure. – dan Jun 15 '18 at 5:33
  • As a learner: in terms whereof == in terms of which, so I guess that would mean that natural Philosophy includes an attempt to understand the natural process! – Cardinal Jun 15 '18 at 5:34
  • @Cardinal: I've tried to rewrite the text like this: "Stoic Physics is a natural Philosophy, and also an attempt is made to understand and describe the natural processes of divine reason or logos which are at work in the Universe." Is it correct? – XVI Jun 17 '18 at 8:57
  • Did you mean Stoicism: A Beginner’s Guide To The History & Philosophy of Stoicism (Stoic Philosophy, Stoicism For Beginners) Either way, d'you see no difference? – Robbie Goodwin Nov 3 '18 at 22:53
1

Given that this is philosophy, I would tend to assume that it is the philosophical meaning of premises - the statements that are taken to be true in an argument, the starting points. The premises of a school of philosophy are its founding assumptions or principles.

You should stick to one question per question, but "in terms" means "in relation to" or "using the terminology", and "whereof" means "of what" or "of which", presumably meaning - given that it is pretty opaque language - that the goal of the school is to do what the rest of the sentence says, or that the author of this piece is going to use the terminology of the school to do what the rest of the sentence says.

0

Premises can mean various things; e.g.

  1. the theories upon which an action or decision is based,
  2. the assumptions upon which a logical argument is based,
  3. it is a legal term for a building and the land on which it stands,
  4. it is a legal term used when referring to an earlier statement within a document,
  5. It can be used in a slightly archaic way for 'the aforementioned', which is similar in meaning to 4 above.

In your case, it sounds like it has the meaning given by 5, in which case "Stoic Physics, in the premises,..." would mean something similar to:

Stoic Physics, which was mentioned earlier,...

Depending on the source of the quote, this earlier mention may have been in an introduction to the current chapter, or in a foreword to a book, or in an introductory paragraph to a monograph, etc.

"In terms whereof" is a rather archaic way of saying "in terms of which". So, this sentence means something like:

Stoic Physics, which was mentioned earlier, is a natural philosophy. Stoic Philosophers tried to understand and describe how the gods affect the universe, in terms of natural processes.

  • I've tried to rewrite the text like this: "Stoic Physics is a natural Philosophy, and also an attempt is made to understand and describe the natural processes of divine reason or logos which are at work in the Universe." Is it correct? – XVI Jun 17 '18 at 8:46
  • I would try something like this: "Stoic Physics is a natural Philosophy in which an attempt is made to understand and describe the natural processes of divine reason or logos which are at work in the Universe." – James Jun 18 '18 at 8:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.