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I am meeting my ex girlfriend after ages today.

What does this sentence mean?

Does it mean, I am yet to meet her today or does that mean that she is with me right now.

And also, could anybody please tell me which one of the below sentences is more natural/correct?

I was meeting my ex girlfriend after ages and the conversation felt awkward.

Vs

I was meeting my ex girlfriend after ages and the conversation was feeling awkward.

It felt or it was feeling, considering that the conversation was still going on?

  • Simple past felt would do; there's no need for was feeling there but it's not ungrammatical. The progressive would reinforce the idea of an ongoing sense of awkwardness. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 15 '18 at 17:36
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We can use present simple to talk about a planned or scheduled event in the future.

My flight is at 10:45am tomorrow
I am leaving tomorrow

I am meeting ... today

This could be simple present meaning it's happening now and going on all day, or it could be a planned event that will happen today- to be planned, it must be later than now.

Inserting after ages into the middle of this sentence does not really work. It would be better to say:

I am meeting my ex-girlfriend today: I haven't seen her for ages.


Moving on to the the past simple/past continuous question:

I was meeting my ex girlfriend and the conversation felt awkward.

This is talking about an event in the past. It's over now, so you should use present simple.

I met my ex girlfriend and the conversation felt awkward.

You would normally only use past continuous if you were in the middle of one thing when something else happened, or it was planned but was cancelled. For met/was meeting:

I was meeting my ex-girlfriend when my new girlfriend walked in.
I was meeting my ex-girlfriend but she got held up at work.

And for felt/was feeling...

I met my ex-girlfriend and the conversation was feeling awkward until we'd had a couple of drinks.

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after ages means "after a long time has elapsed".

I am meeting...today means "I intend to meet (later) today"

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