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I was told that

"We are looking for an eager person to work for our company"

is not the same as

"We are looking for a person who is eager to work for our company"

, but the same as

"We are looking for a person to work for our company, who is eager."

So it means that "An eager person to do smt" is not the same as "A person eager to do smt"

Okay..

If this logic is correct,

Does "the hardest book for me" mean "the book for me which is the hardest" ?

or

does "the most difficult book for me to read" mean "the book for me to read, which is the most difficult" ?

I believe that there is definitely a problem here.

In my opinion;

The hardest book for me to read is Inferno. = The book which is the hardest for me to read is Inferno.

"You are the most amazing friend to hang out with." = "You are the friend who is the most amazing to hang out with."

There is something wrong because what I was told is not working properly.

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  • We are looking for a person (who is) eager to work for our company. That implies the person already has an idea about the company. – Lambie Jun 17 '18 at 16:33
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The bit you are missing is that eager can take a complement (introduced by for, or a to-infinitive clause), and when it does it has a different meaning from eager without a complement.

Neither hard nor amazing has this property. You can say that something is hard for somebody, but that narrows its scope, it doesn't change the basic meaning. (Structurally, this suggests that the for argument is an adjunct rather than a complement)

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  • I understand what you mean and it is a very bright point, however, I think that "for" is a complement theoretically just as in the sentence with the infinitive clause. This book is the hardest to read. (We can not say that "to read" is an adjunct rather than a complement. It is totally the complement of the adjective "the hardest".) – Jawel Jun 17 '18 at 16:55
  • There is a semantic issue that is not being addressed. We want an eager person to do the job, does not work semantically. We want a motivated person to do the job. – Lambie Jun 17 '18 at 17:17
  • I agree, @Jawel: hard can indeed take a to infinitive clause as a complement, and i missed that. But that doesn't affect the question or the answer, because the question assumed that the for argument of hard was parallel with the for/to argument of eager - a complement. – Colin Fine Jun 17 '18 at 22:13
  • Yes, I agree with you. Let me give you an idea about it. I think that all for/to are complements there, which is unnecessary to talk about. The difference between "for" with eager and the other "for" with hard, is that the "for" with hard indicates a reference, takes a reference. Example, "Bob is a short player for the coach to put in the game" = "Bob is a player who is short for the coach to put in the game". They are totally the same. Because it takes a reference. Bob is short among people who the coach can put in the game. In these kinds of contexts, this usage is OK, I think.. – Jawel Jun 17 '18 at 23:43
  • @ColinFine I will give you the hardest book to read = I will give you the book which is the hardest to read. They are totally the same again. Why? Because it takes a reference/comparison again. "That book is the hardest which you can read. It's the hardest for the action of reading." Again, a comparison. I met a nice girl to be with. = I met a girl who is nice to be with. They are the same. Why? Because it is a comparison. That girl is nice for the action of going out together, being together but maybe for something else, she is not nice. – Jawel Jun 17 '18 at 23:46
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The most difficult book for me to read...

is a rather clumsy way of putting the words together, though you will hear it from the mouths of native speakers.

If the idea is that the book is complicated and difficult, far more so than any other book under consideration, the phrase that belongs together is most difficult to read.

If the idea is that the book is complicated and difficult for me in particular, although someone else might not find it so, the phrase that belongs together is

most difficult for me to read.

The book most difficult for me to read is X.

for me can be moved to the head of the sentence:

For me, the book most difficult to read is X.

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