1

Do both of the following sentences have the same meaning?

1- My salary is twice higher than yours.
2- My salary is twice as high as yours.

  • @RubioRic , in the question that you recommended me to study, it is mentioned that the former is correct and you should avoid the later, but it's not explained that why the second sentence is wrong, would you please tell me why? – sasan taghadosi Jun 22 '18 at 12:21
  • Sorry, I got not an explanation for that, I'm no native English speaker like the one who answered the linked question. He stated that your first sentence is not standard. James has already answered your question though. – RubioRic Jun 22 '18 at 12:26
3

In standard English you are more likely to hear the second sentence than the first. Technically, the two sentences mean different things.

My salary is twice higher than yours.

This means I get paid three times your salary.

My salary is twice as high as yours.

This means I get paid two times your salary.

In reality, if I heard the first sentence, I would not be sure if the person was trying to say that they earned twice as much as me (but got the maths wrong) or three times as much as me (and got the maths right).

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