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Tell please which sentence is correct.

Could you tell me what wrong is with Kate?

Could you tell me what is wrong with Kate?

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The second sentence is correct for what is almost certainly the intended meaning.

The natural assumption of intended meaning would be that there is an issue with Kate, and so is precedes wrong to express Kate's current state (that something is wrong).

The first sentence could potentially be correct, but that usage would be pretty unusual. The interpretation in this case would be that there is a wrong (as a noun, as in righting a wrong) which is accompanying Kate. Even if that were the intended meaning this construction would likely not be the first choice of a native speaker to express it.

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