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I want to know the meaning of these sentences

I am loved

I was loved

I will be loved

I have been loved

What is the difference between them?

closed as off-topic by Tetsujin, Em., user3169, shin, Peter Jun 26 '18 at 7:27

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    Can you please tell us what you know. Do you recognize or know their tenses, can you name them? Do they all mean the same to you? Obviously not, so you need to provide details if you want users to help you. – Mari-Lou A Jun 25 '18 at 7:42
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    Do you know what the verb "love" means? Do you know what it means when someone says they love another? For example, Ann loves Ben, so Ben is loved by Ann. But we don't know if Ben loves Ann. he might or might not. – Mari-Lou A Jun 25 '18 at 12:12
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I shall presume that the OP understands what the verb "love" means. I shall also presume that @mark understands what it means when someone says they love another person.

For example,

  1. Ann loves Ben (Active Voice, Present Simple)
    Ben is loved by Ann. (Passive Voice, PS)

But does Ben love Ann? We do not know, he might or might not.

  1. Ann loved Ben (Active Voice, Simple Past)
    Ben was loved [by Ann] (Passive Voice, SP)

In the past, Ann loved Ben. But not now, not in the present. Did Ben ever love Ann? We do not know. But we do know that he is not loved by her now …aaahhsob

  1. Someone else will love Ann (Active, “Future”)
    Ann will be loved [by someone else] (Passive, Simple Future)

At some point in the future, someone else will love Ann. We do not know when this will happen, but we are confident it will occur. This type of phrase can be seen as being a prediction, a promise or a hypothesis.

  1. Ann has loved [four men in her life] (Active, Present Perfect)
    Ann has been loved [by one or more men] (Passive, Present Perfect)

Until “today”, Ann has loved four men. It is likely that she is not in love now, but this does not exclude the possibility that one day love will find her again. Hooray!

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I am loved now (Present tense)

I was loved at some time in the past but not now (Past tense)

I will be loved at some time in the future (Future tense)

I have been loved in the past and still in the present, or I have been loved in the past and this has some connection to the present (Present Perfect tense)

Of these, the fourth is the most ambiguous. Grammatically it has the meaning given above. In common use it is sometimes used with the meaning, "I was loved at some time in the past but not now". Technically, people intending this alternative meaning should say, 'I was loved", but the way language is used is constantly changing. The context of surrounding sentences may help to clarify the ambiguity.

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