1

Which of the following is correct?

"I was seven time zones away meaning that I got few disturbances."
or
"I was seven time zones away meant that I got few disturbances."

Thanks in advance for helping me out!

2

"I was seven time zones away meaning that I got few disturbances."
or
"I was seven time zones away meant that I got few disturbances."

Neither seem completely correct, but I believe the intended meaning is:

"I was seven time zones away, which meant that I got few disturbances.

Other ways of rendering it could be:

"Being seven time zones away meant that I got few disturbances."
"I was seven time zones away and so I got few disturbances."

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1

Your first is fine (though I'd put a comma before meaning). The second doesn't make sense.

The first is equivalent to which means/meant that. (I put the present or past there because the participle meaning is neutral as to tense, so in general it could be either. But I agree with Astralbee that the past which meant that is more natural there.)

The second would be equivalent to which is/was meant that, because the so-called past participle meant is inherently passive, so if you expand it to a full clause you need the passive form is/was meant. But which was meant that I got few disturbances doesn't make sense.

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0

The word to use here is "meaning," not "meant."

If you were to write this as two sentences, you'd write:

I was seven time zones away. That meant that I got few disturbances.

But how do you combine these two sentences into one? Since "that" is the subject of the sentence, you need to use the active participle. The active participle of "to mean" is "meaning." (The active participle is also called the present participle, but this is misleading.) So the combined sentence is:

I was seven time zones away, meaning that I got few disturbances.

The passive participle (also called the past participle) is used when you're talking about the object of an action. For example, consider these two sentences:

I walked into the kitchen and saw my husband baking some cookies.

I looked inside the cookie jar and saw some cookies baked by my husband.

In both of these sentences, we use a participle in order to say that my husband baked the cookies. In the first sentence, we use "baking" (the active participle) because my husband is the subject of the sentence "my husband baked the cookies." In the second sentence, we use "baked" (the passive participle) because the cookies are the object of the sentence "my husband baked the cookies."

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