2

Are all these sentences below correct and interchangeable?

1) It has more to do with that I am lazy than that I am tired.

2) It has more to do with the fact that I am lazy than that I am tired.

3) It has more to do with the fact that I am lazy than the fact that I am tired.

4) It has more to do with that I am lazy rather than that I am tired.

5) It has more to do with the fact that I am lazy rather than that I am tired.

6) It has more to do with the fact that I am lazy rather than the fact that I am tired.

(4. 5. and the 6. sentences are the same as the first three sentences except that I changed "than" to "rather than")

One more question: Are these sentences correct and interchangeable?

7) It has to do with the fact that I am lazy rather than that I am tired.

8) It has to do with that I am lazy rather than that I am tired.

My opinion on these eight sentences: I guess I have to use the phrase "the fact that" after the word "with", but I think I can use the word "that" after "than", and I guess it is better to use "that" after "than" or "rather than" instead of using "the fact that". Also I think "rather than" and "than" are interchangeable in the first six sentences I gave. What do you think?

  • 7 and 8 lack a comparative. (more with X than with Y) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 28 '18 at 16:09
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo Isn't "rather than" some flavor of comparative? – Andrew Jun 28 '18 at 16:14
  • @Andrew; You are right, of course. For some reason, my brain didn't see rather in the second clause. I think after reading 1-6, a rut had been cut in the gray matter :) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 28 '18 at 16:32
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo Thanks. Do you think all those sentences are correct? Can I use "that" after "with" there? – Fire and Ice Jun 28 '18 at 23:51
  • Yes, the fact that and that are interchangeable, although some speakers would feel that the fact that is the more natural or conversational of the two. To my ear, the register of "has to do with the fact that I am lazy" is consistent, whereas "has to do with that I am lazy" seems to combine a conversational register and a somewhat more formal register. There's a slight "hiccup". That there is a slight register hiccup may be of no concern to you. :-) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 29 '18 at 12:26
1

They're all fine as written. Some are more wordy than others, but that might be something you want, in the right context.

There's not much more to say, so instead here are some other options:

It is more (the fact) that I am lazy than that I am tired.

It has more to do with laziness than tiredness.

It is more laziness than tiredness.

I'm more lazy than tired.

I don't really like "tiredness". Sure, it's in the dictionary but in my opinion it's clunky. "Weariness" is a little better, if you want to keep the "-ness" alliteration:

It is more laziness than weariness.

Or you can repeat the "L" sound:

It is more laziness than lassitude.

You do have to be careful with alliteration. Because it's such an obvious literary affectation, it can sound forced rather than elegant. It may be better style to just use two different nouns:

It is more lethargy than fatigue.

  • You don't have to use "fact". It's just a common expression. In my opinion all of those expressions are too wordy, and a good writer should go with something more succinct. But that's all personal preference. – Andrew Jun 29 '18 at 0:21
  • By "you don't have to use 'fact'", you mean I don't have to use it after "with", right? As far as I know, in the sentences like "Because of the fact that he is a good person, he is always losing" or "Despite the fact that I love cola, I won't drink it anymore", we can't replace "the fact that" with "that". – Fire and Ice Jun 29 '18 at 0:36
  • Can you also please look at this question I asked which has to do with this topic? ell.stackexchange.com/questions/170709/… – Fire and Ice Jun 29 '18 at 1:58
  • @FireandIce "because of the fact that ..." is the same as "because ...". It's redundant, but nevertheless a natural English expression. There's really not much more to say about this phrase. – Andrew Jun 29 '18 at 2:13
  • Yeah. I know that it is the same as "because". We can't say "because of that" instead of it though. – Fire and Ice Jun 29 '18 at 2:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.