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It is from this video. It is at around 4 minute and 54 second. Here it goes:

Curiosity motivates you to ask questions and learn: What turns you on? What turns you off? Is it ok? How can I make it better? (Because) you don't assume that you have figured it out and you know until the end of time how you or the other person or the dynamic between you is going to be.

It seems to me that without the word because the last sentence doesn't make sense. How can someone know what the dynamic between them is going to be if they don't think they figured it out?

  • The "don't" applies to the whole sentence, not only the first part. You asked "How can someone know?". They don't... – Sam Jul 1 '18 at 18:37
  • So the speaker could say "not only do you assume that you figured it out nor you know...", am I right? – Dmytro O'Hope Jul 1 '18 at 20:34
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    I think this would read better if you left out you - "Don't assume that you have figured it out and you know until the end of time how you or the other person or the dynamic between you is going to be". The last sentence isn't an explanation or effect, as it doesn't answer any of the questions. – user3169 Jul 1 '18 at 21:57
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You may notice the video is edited. The woman in the video is making a lot of declarative statements which are not responses to questions. They're definitive examples to support a particular point, and each may be separate, or connected to the previous statement, depending on the editing.

Here all of these statements are examples of how to "stay curious", one example of which is to "ask questions and learn", questions such as "What turns you on?" "What turns you off?" "How can I make it better?".

She then goes on to talk about why you should ask questions. The sentence "You don't assume that you have figured it out ..." is not a response to the previous questions, but instead a completely separate statement related to the "stay curious" theme. There is no reason for it to start with "because". It's advice, not explanation.

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