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Free-agent center DeMarcus Cousins has reached agreement on a one-year, $5.3 million deal with the NBA champion Golden State Warriors, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

According to Wiki, a free agent means:

In professional sports, a free agent is a player who is eligible to sign with any club or franchise; i.e., not under contract to any specific team.

But what does "Free-agent center" truly mean in this sentence? Is it a center where all the free agent are gathered, or DeMarcus Cousins himself is the Free-agent center implying he is a 'center' person amongst all the others? I speculate the latter according to the context, but I am not quite sure.

A side question: why is there not any article preceding free-agent center, like "A free-agent center" or "The free-agent center"?

The full source.

  • "Center" is a position on a basketball team. DeMarcus Cousins is a basketball player who plays that position (center) who was also a free agent, hence a "free-agent center" ... – Robusto Jul 3 '18 at 3:21
  • @Robusto oh, I see. why there's no article preceding it? Is it better to put commas in between, like free-agent, center, DaMarcus Cousins...? – dan Jul 3 '18 at 3:31
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    @dan - No commas. See this column for an explanation why. No article, either. While I don’t think it would be grammatically wrong to include one, I think the opening sentence reads better without one. – J.R. Jul 3 '18 at 8:47
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The article is talking about a player on a basketball team. A center is somebody who plays in a certain position on court.

According to ActiveSG:

The centre is generally the tallest player who is positioned near the basket as he must be able to get up as high as possible for rebounds. He is also required to be more physically domineering with more physical strength and overall athleticism.

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