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I have a confusion about usage of ''has something to do with'' phrase.

When I use it just with a noun or a noun clause , I have no problem at using it correctly.

However, if I want to use a complete sentence (verb+subject) after it, I have some problem about it.

eg;

  1. There is an economical problem. It has something to do with bad import-export ratio.

  2. There is an economical problem. It has something to do with import rises. (import is the subject; rise the verb)

sentence 1 is correct in my opinion but I am not sure about sentence 2.

If it is incorrect, how can I make that sentence when I want to use verb+subject after ''has something to do with'' phrase?

  • rises in sentence 2 is not a verb but a plural noun. – StoneyB on hiatus Jul 4 '18 at 0:23
  • @StoneyB I believe they've intended it as a verb (as in ...to do with the fact that import rises/is rising). – userr2684291 Jul 4 '18 at 0:30
  • I made sentence 2 to be able to ask that question, it is my own sentence and I have inteded ''rise'' as a verb. İn the condition that ''rise'' is a verb; İf I make the sentence in this way is it ok? There is an economical problem.İt has something to do with the fact that import rises/ is rising. Thanks in advance – ullas84 Jul 4 '18 at 0:40
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"it has something to do with" should be followed by a noun.

For example: "it has something to do with tacos" or "it has something to do with this book".

I want to use verb+subject

Let's say the verb+subject is "the frog jumps." The first attempt at the sentence is "it has something to do with (the) frog jumps" which is not correct. However, it could be worded: "it has something to do with the frog jumping" or "the frog's jumping". That's a gerund phrase.

Googling the terms "gerund" and "possessive", many grammar articles indicate the possessive form is required, which means "the frog's jumping" should be chosen. In actual real world usage though, the possessive isn't always applied.

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