2

A. Let's make a birthday cake for her.
B. Good idea. I'll write her a card. Don't forget to write one, too/either.
A. I won't.

5

too / either indicates that one person or things is (to be) treated the same as one that has already been mentioned. too is used in positive sentences:

I have told Jane. - positive
I have told Mary too. - positive

either is used in negative sentences, but only if the first sentence is also negative:

I haven't told Jane. - negative
Don't tell Mary either! - negative

If you have a positive sentence followed by a negative sentence, you use too, even though the second sentence is negative...

I have told Jane. - positive
Don't tell Mary too! - negative

Adding forget to doesn't really affect the choice of adverb:

I have told Jane. - positive
Don't forget to tell Mary too! - negative

So, in your sentence, the two parts are:

I'll write her a card. - positive
Don't forget to write one, too - negative

too is the correct adverb to use, even though the second sentence is negative, because the first sentence is positive.

Note that, if both sentences are negative, you use either:

I won't forget to write her a card. - negative
Don't forget to write one, either - negative

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.