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First question

I want to show that in the future or present it's not possible for him to bend the knee

  1. Even if you want to bend the knee you will not be able to do that
  2. Even if you wanted to bend the knee you wouldn't be able to do that

Which one is correct and why?

Second question

  1. Back then, if I wanted to have it, I would get it
  2. Back then, if I had wanted to have itm I would have gotten it

Which one is correct and why?

Third question

Can we use the second structure of if clause to speak about some thing hard to be true but in the future?

  • Why do you think any of your sentences are incorrect? You will need to add more detail so we can write a good answer to your question. The short answer is that all are fine, but the meaning of each is slightly different. Also, I don't understand what you mean by "the second structure of if clause". Do you mean the second conditional? – Andrew Jul 5 '18 at 19:49
  • Also, you should be aware that the expression "to bend the knee" is, as far as I know, unique to the fictional HBO series Game of Thrones. Most every historical reference would simply say "to kneel". – Andrew Jul 5 '18 at 19:51
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"If you want to bend the knee, you will not be allowed to" is oriented to the future. It does not preclude your being allowed to bend the knee right now.

"If you wanted to bend the knee, you would not be allowed to" is oriented to the present. You are not going to be permitted now, but you may be permitted to do so in the future.

"If you had wanted to bend the knee, you would not have been allowed to" relates to the past, but is silent as to present and future.

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