3

It was in this video. It is at around 2 minute and 34 second. Here is the context:

I was in a small valley called the Korengal Valley in eastern Afganistan. It was 6 miles long. There were 150 men of (a/the) battle company in that valley.

Dictionaries say, in this context, that company is a military unit of soldiers and it is a countable noun. Then why did the speaker decide to leave any article out?

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    It appears to me to be a mistake. – Jeff Morrow Jul 7 '18 at 13:21
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    @JeffMorrow, a bit of research might have paid off... see below. – JavaLatte Jul 7 '18 at 13:38
7

You are right that company as a military term is normally countable. In this instance, however, the term Battle Company appears to be a proper noun, and proper nouns do not normally have articles: see this article for more information.

Here is one of many articles relating to the same group of men:

The soldiers of Battle Company of the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team live there in dusty tents and little wooden huts. New York Times

Note the capital letters B and C, which indicate that it is a proper noun, and note also the absence of an article.

2

Militaryspeak is full of confusing proper nouns like "Battle Company," "Delta River," and "Go Team." Because it was in a video rather than text, you can't exactly know if it was countable, as is "the/a battle company," or a proper noun, as is "our beloved Battle Company." However, if there was a slight pause before the phrase, giving it a bit of emphasis, then you may have reason to suspect that it was a proper noun and did not need an article. Do not despair; this is a subtlety that can be learned. We all now understand "One small step for man..." Until then, you can counterattack by subsequently referring to it as "designated Battle Company," which makes it a pronoun in either case.

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