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What tense is used in the sentence: "You will be amazed"

If it is the future perfect tense then the rules on the internet say in order to form the future perfect tense one must use will + have + past participle(verb) for example "You will have worked" I have read that here - http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/tenses/future_perfect.htm

But in order to form the future progressive tense we use will + be + present participle for eg - You will be walking . But then why we say "You will be amazed" despite saying "You will be amazing or You will have amazed" . Why are we mixing the rules for future progressive and future perfect Or can we also use will + be + past participle for eg - You will be amazed . Please clear this confusion of mine !

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  • Why do you think that "you will be amazed" is future perfect? It does not contain a form of have followed by a past participle, therefore it is not any kind of perfect. It does contain be followed by a past participle, therefore it can be a passive (though it is not necessarily - it could also be be + adjective). – Colin Fine Jul 8 '18 at 23:19
  • the simple answer is because it is neither future perfect nor future progressive. It is simple future (but passive) – eques Dec 14 '18 at 15:25
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Your example doesn't mix the rules for future progressive and future perfect.  Instead, it combines the rules for the future tense and the passive voice. 

 

The future tense typically involves using some verb or verb phrase that carries a future-tense meaning along with an infinitive verb or verb phrase. 

I will amaze you.
I shall amaze you.
I am going to amaze you.

The auxiliaries "will" and "shall" license a bare infinitive.  The verb phrase "am going" isn't an auxiliary, so it licenses a full infinitive.  All three of these examples employ the future tense, active voice, indefinite aspect and indicative mode. 

 

The passive voice typically involves using some form of the verb to be followed by a so-called past participle form. 

You were amazed. -- past tense, something amazed you
You are amazed. -- present tense, something amazes you
You are going to be amazed. -- future tense, something will amaze you

 

You will be amazed.

This follows both sets of conventions.  It has a verb that indicates the future tense followed by an infinitive: "will" + "be". It also has some form of to be followed by a past participle: "be" + "amazed". 

 

We can even add the perfect aspect to the future tense and passive voice.  The perfect aspect is marked by some form of the verb to have followed by a past participle.  On its own, it looks like this:

I have amazed you.

Combining all three looks like this:

You will have been amazed.

A future-tense verb followed by an infinitive: "will" + "have" = future.
A form of to have followed by a past participle: "have" + "been" = perfect.
A form of to be followed by a past participle: "been" + "amazed" = passive.

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The future perfect is a rare tense in that it refers to an action in the future that is expected or promised to happen before another action. The passive form of the future perfect is very rare. The future progressive is less rare, but the passive form is far from common.

All future tenses start with "will" or "shall."

All perfect tenses end with the past participle of the principal verb and are preceded by some form of "have."

All passive forms end with the past participle of the principal verb and are preceded by some form of the "be."

All passive perfects end with "been" plus the past participle of the principal verb and are preceded by some form of "have."

All progressive tenses end with the present participle of the principal verb and are preceded by some form of "be."

All passive progressives end with "being" plus the past participle of the principal verb and are preceded by some form of "be" other than "being."

"You (will/shall) amuse them." Simple future indicative.

"You (will/shall) be amused." Simple future passive.

"You (will/shall) be amusing them." Future progressive indicative.

"You (will/shall) be being amused." Future progressive passive.

"You (will/shall) have amused them." Future perfect indicative.

"You (will/shall) have been amused." Future perfect passive.

  • All future tense constructions begin with "will" or "shall"? That's going to be hard to support. – Gary Botnovcan Jul 20 '18 at 18:59
  • What do you mean by 'future past perfect'? – amI Oct 15 '18 at 4:09
  • @aml I did not say "future past perfect." Where do you see that? – Jeff Morrow Oct 15 '18 at 20:53
  • @JeffMorrow in the first sentence "The future past perfect is a rare tense" – eques Dec 14 '18 at 15:23
  • @eques Oh so I did. Typo obviously. Shall fix. Thank you very much. – Jeff Morrow Dec 14 '18 at 21:38

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