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I had this sentence in my English exercise book:

"Jupiter is the largest planet in the solar system, being eleven times the size of the earth."

So exactly what kind of grammar is it? (with one shared subject ["Jupiter"], a comma and two verbs (? I don't really know if "being" is called a verb))

One more extra question: Can I replace "being" with "is"?

Thank you in advanced.

Edit 1: Does the quoted sentence above have the same grammar pattern with these below sentences:

"Seeing her, I ran away." ;

"Written in 2018, 'Nervous' is Shawn Mendes's latest >song."

The similarity of these three sentences is, they have the same subject(s).

So, my exact question is: What do you call the piece of grammar that combines sentences/clauses sharing the same subject, as the examples above?

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Being is not a finite verb - it is a participle.

"Being eleven times the size of the Earth" is a non-finite clause, with adverbial effect. This is a rather formal or literary construction.

You cannot replace being with is, because English does not normally allow multiple verb phrases without some expressed relationship between them (as your question implies).

In speech, I think you would most likely make it a second sentence:

"Jupiter is the largest planet in the solar system. It is eleven times the size of the earth"

or else leave out the participle entirely:

"Jupiter is the largest planet in the solar system, eleven times the size of the earth."

(This last is formally ambiguous, as it is not specific what is being claimed to be eleven times the size of the earth; but I don't think it is ambiguous in practice).

Often, a participle used this way can be replaced by relative clause ("which is"), or a verb and subordinating conjunction: ("as it is" or "since it is"), but I can't think of one which will make sense in this context.

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  • Thank you for your detailed answer. I had a different question come up in my mind. Does the quoted sentence above have the same grammar pattern with these below sentences: "Seeing her, I ran away." ; "Written in 2018, 'Nervous' is Shawn Mendes's latest song." The similarity of these three sentences is, they have the same subject(s). Ok, so my exact question is: What do you call the piece of grammar that combines sentences/clauses sharing the same subject, as the examples above? Jul 9, 2018 at 14:26

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