0

The situation is this "In an email, I wrote about the person due to his incorrect information, he wasted my time. for which he replied that his information was correct with some supporting reasons (which is actually not acceptable by me. because it is not true) and put the blame back on me." his reply is just to protection himself from the higher officials in the email cc. they are just going to take the decision or react based on the information in the email.

It is common character of most of the people. but some people they don't correct their mistakes at all. Always They will use this strategy and escape from their faults.

What is the proper phrase or word to be used while referring this type person or his actions?

Can I say, "he just trying to defend" or "he just blames" or is there a different way to express it?

  • could you put some hint where you want to use the word in the sentence _____ is often used – WendyG Jul 10 '18 at 16:24
  • How about "Mr. Know-it-all", who is never wrong? – user3169 Jul 10 '18 at 18:41
  • In the title, you are asking for the term to be used for a person (noun). In the body, you are asking for a word/term to denote his action (verb). Clarify first! – Maulik V Jul 11 '18 at 3:38
  • @WendyG I have given little more explanation about my question. Now please check, If my explanation makes sense. – Aayvu.com Jul 11 '18 at 3:54
  • @user3169 the person I am referring here is not a kind that he say he knows everything. but they are the kind of person never accepts their mistake. but will give some wrong or false information and say they are correct to protect themselves. – Aayvu.com Jul 11 '18 at 4:08
0

Some suggestions:

You might say that he is scapegoating, which is probably what I would use in the situation, but if you're in a workplace where most people speak English as a second language it's likely they wont understand.

Blame-shifter, blamer, buck-passer, blame-artist, and finger-pointer all describe someone who shifts the blame onto others, but aren't in common usage.

Stubborn and obdurate mean someone who wont change their ways even when confronted.

Evasive (in this context) means someone who avoids criticism.

EDIT: In a less formal setting, you might also say he is covering his own ass.

Regardless, pick whichever you find most applicable.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.