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Is this sentence correct?

I did it yesterday, but I’m not going to do it again.

I’m not sure about it. Should I replace “it” with “that”?

  1. I did it yesterday, but I’m not going to do it again.
  2. I did it yesterday, but I’m not going to do that again.
  3. I did that yesterday, but I’m not going to do it again.
  4. I did that yesterday, but I’m not going to do that again.

Are all versions correct?

3
  • Both sentences are correct. But if for a formal use, you'd better have "going to" instead of "gonna".
    – None
    Commented Feb 10, 2014 at 16:46
  • @Laure FYI I've edited the question to show 4 possibilities and rewritten "gonna". Commented Feb 10, 2014 at 16:56
  • This is a great question. thank you.
    – Vladimir
    Commented Jun 19, 2020 at 19:00

4 Answers 4

1

All four sound natural to me :)

1

I think you want option 1) or option 3). If I were going to say option 3), I would place the emphasis on Yesterday, as in, "I've already tried that; I did it yesterday; it didn't work; I'm not doing it again." The first option is more neutral. Options 2 and 4 sound odd to me.

1
  • Is it correct to replace "again" with "anymore"? Does it still make sense? Thank You for Your help guys. It means a lot to me :).
    – user3920
    Commented Feb 14, 2014 at 18:49
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I feel that in most of the cases, it and that are interchangeable. However, in some cases, they are strictly not! For instance, a slogan Just do it! won't sound proper with Just do that! The same thing may go for an idiom for encouragement You can do it!

If I dig it further for a subtle difference, the word that refers to anything that's mentioned or understood, whereas it may refer to anything which is previously mentioned or understood.

Broadly, all sentences seem okay but still, I'd prefer using it for the latter clause when that is already mentioned!

0

The word that is generally used for specific objects.

For example: That car belongs to me.

Or its used when you're comparing two objects.

For example: Red Bull's car is faster than that of Ferrari.

(See how I used "it" there).

1
  • you din' use it anywhere!
    – Maulik V
    Commented Feb 17, 2014 at 7:10

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