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Introductory clauses are dependent clauses that are often found at the beginning of the sentence (although they can be moved to the end of the sentence, too, without confusing the meaning of the sentence).

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Any examples of an introductory clause moved to the end of a sentence ?

Also, what is the difference between an introductory sentence to open a paragraph on an essay, and an introductory clause in terms of tone/suitability/effect? Is one better suited to a certain essay/article over another ?

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    After removing some syntactically irrelevant elements, your own first sentence could be recast as Although they can be moved to the end of the sentence, introductory clauses are dependent clauses that are often found at the beginning of the sentence. Personally, although I think that exact example is stylistically somewhat clumsy, I've no problem with calling the highlighted element a "dependent clause" or an "introductory clause". But I really can't see why anyone would still want to call it an "introductory clause" if it were moved to the end rather than the start. – FumbleFingers Jul 18 '18 at 16:25
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A typical use of an introductory clause is in a conditional sentence.

If you work hard, you will pass your exam.

You can place the clause at the end (it's not an introductory clause in that case because it is at the end.)

You will pass your exam if you work hard.

Introductory clauses and the introductory sentences are not really comparable. An introductory sentence may have several clauses. An introductory sentence is not a grammatical construction, it is a rhetorical construction.

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