3

What is the difference between:

The package will be delivered in two days' time.

And

The package will be delivered within two days.

Are they the same or different?

4

If today is Monday, and a company tells me:

Your package will arrive in two days' time.

then I will expect the package to arrive on Wednesday.

However, if today is Monday, and a company tells me:

Your package will arrive within two days.

then I will expect the package to arrive on Tuesday or Wednesday.

If we change the verbiage from two to four then:

  • in four days' time means the package is expected to arrive on Friday
  • within four days means the package will arrive no later than Friday – but it could arrive on Thursday or perhaps even on Wednesday.

In other words, "in two days' time" is typically a prediction, while "within two days" specifies an upper limit.

  • So it's ''in two days''=''in two days' time'' right? But why did they put ''time'' in that? – John Arvin Jul 19 '18 at 0:49
  • 1
    I guess it's colloquial – J.R. Jul 19 '18 at 3:40
1

in two days time = when the delivery will occur

within two days = implies there is a limit. No later than two days.

You must do this task in two days. [usually, two days from some date or you have two days to do it.]

You must do this task within two days. [we don't know when those days will be and it sets a time limit on how long you can take.]

within two days = within 48 hours. [sets a limit]

in two days = in 48 hours. [says when or describes how many days are needed]

  • I think it's 48 hours for 2 days. – John Arvin Jul 19 '18 at 0:46

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