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I was reading an examiner’s comments about an essay written by someone. The essay is about describing the changes that’s going to be happen to a place according to a plan.

In the essay, the writer used “be going to” to describe the changes that is going to happen.

The examiner commented that “going to” is over used, and there could be more variety of language that can express future plans.

I didn’t understand what the comment meant, because I think “going to” is the only appropriate and the form of future which I would use.

Do you have any ideas about what the examiner was meaning?

That’s the future plan which was described by the writer: enter image description here The examiner commented on the over use of “going to” in this paragraph enter image description here My question is: What other forms of future we can use in this case other than “going to”?

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    Please don't post pictures of text. They can't be searched or indexed, they are slow to load and hard to read on mobile devices, they can't be viewed at all by users with vision problems, and they don't add anything that the text didn't already say. – stangdon Jul 20 '18 at 12:18
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"Going to" could easily be replaced with "will be," or you could restructure your sentences and use advanced word choice to avoid "will be" and "going to" altogether.

There are better words the writer can use instead of "going to," "bigger," "larger," etc.

For example, he/she could change, "sports centre is going to become bigger" to:

1) The sports centre will be expanded.

2) The new sports centre, twice the size of the old one, will feature a changing room and a larger gym. (If you'd like to combine 2 sentences)

3) The plans for the new sports centre include a changing room and a larger gym, among other things.

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You sentence has a grammatical error:

The essay is about describing the changes that’s going to be happen to a place according to a plan. The essay is about describing the changes that’s going to be happen to a place according to a plan.

The part that is bolded should either read:

  • that's going to happen

or:

  • that's going to be happening

but not:

  • that's going to be happen

Now, about your examiner's comment, I think a simpler way to say this is:

The essay is about describing the changes that will happen to a place according to a plan.

It's less wordy, more direct, and counters your notion that going to is "the only appropriate and the form of future" for you to use. Other ways to say this might include:

  • The changes that are planned for the Sports Centre.
  • The changes that are slated for the Sports Centre.
  • The changes in store for the Sports Centre.

Indeed, a phrase like going to can be overused, particular if it is seen over and over again in a few short paragraphs. I'm going to say that I agree with the examiner's comment.

  • I edited the question again, because it seems you didn’t understand what exactly I mean. Please read my question again! – Asmaa Jul 20 '18 at 10:46
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    I do understand what you mean. I stand by my answer: The redeveloped sports centre will become larger, with an additional changing room, etc. – J.R. Jul 20 '18 at 11:38

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