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Discouraged by failures in the bar exams, a law school graduate recently committed a suicide, and the leading cause of her suicide is putatively frustration by failures in the bar exams.

I'm having a hard time finding the right expressions for the second half of my sentence.

The candidates are like the below.

1) She is assumed to commit a suicide due to frustration by her failures in the bar exams 2) the putative cause of suicide is failures in her bar exams. 3) the leading cause of her suicide is putatively frustration by failures in the bar exams.

Does an expression "the leading cause of her suicide is putatively X" sound natural? If not, I need your advice.

Thank you in advance.

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the leading cause of her suicide is putatively frustration

I fail to see why you need to use both 'leading' and 'putatively' as they mean essentially the same thing.

Putative means:

generally considered or believed to be

'generally' means:

usually, or in most situations

'leading' means:

principal, foremost, most common, most likely

So, the 'putative cause' of her suicide, and the 'leading cause' of her suicide, both refer to the cause of her suicide that is most commonly held to be true. So all you need to say is:

Discouraged by failures in the bar exams, a law school graduate recently committed a suicide, and the (leading or putative) cause of her suicide is frustration [at her] failures in the bar exams. (select only one of the two options)

Note: I switched 'by' to 'at her' because 'frustration' is much more commonly followed by 'at' than 'by' (Ngram). Adding 'her' in the phrase 'at her failures' is not essential, but for me it causes the phrase to run more easily of the tongue.

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the leading cause of her suicide is putatively frustration

In this example, the word putative should be used. Because putatively, if that's even a word, seems an adverb. And an adverb is used to modify a verb.

Whereas in the above sentence, frustration is a noun. Therefore, instead of an adverb, an adjective should be used to highlight the quality of the noun. Putative is an adjective.

For example, beautiful is an adjective and beautifully is an adverb. So, you never say, "She has a beautifully face." You use the adjective, beautiful because face is a noun. But you do say, "She smiles beautifully," because smiles is a verb.

This is what sounds natural and correct to me:

leading cause of her suicide is the putative frustration of failures in the bar exam.

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