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What English common word or phrase used to describe Passing of humorous complimentary remarks on food one is eating (the remarks are considered silly or funny and as showing that the speaker is unaccustomed to good or well-cooked meals)?

I am looking for English equivalent expression for a Hausa word santi or fanya.

For example, Mr A hosted Mr B for a dinner in his house. Mr B was served a good food (specially prepared for him) eating together with Mr A and some members of A's family. During the dinner Mr B suddenly made a remark not necessarily considered complimentary but considered silly and funny by his listeners.

Assuming I am among the listeners who were laughing already, how could I in English common expression show that the speaker was carried away by the taste of the good food to make fun of him alluding to the fact that he was unaccustomed to that type of food which he never ate before?

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    Do you mean "considered bad manners in America" or in your native country? Does a common word or phrase exist in your native language? Can you give an example of a humourous complimentary remark that you think would be bad manners. – James K Jul 23 '18 at 9:05
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    I don't think there is one. It is just called conversation, or pleasantries – WendyG Jul 23 '18 at 10:00
  • For example, Mr A hosted Mr B for a dinner in his house. Mr B was served a good food (specially prepared for him) eating together with Mr A and some members of A's family. During the dinner Mr B suddenly made a remark not necessarily considered complimentary but considered silly and funny by his listeners. Assuming I am among the listeners who were laughing already, how could I in English common expression show that the speaker was carried away by the taste of the good food to make fun of him alluding to the fact that he was unaccustomed to that type of food which he never ate before? – iandu76 Jul 23 '18 at 10:43
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    Honestly that last comment made it no clearer for me. Perhaps you could translate a specific example? – Astralbee Jul 23 '18 at 11:05
  • Is the person unaccustomed to good food, or is the person unaccustomed to this exotic food (which is good), or is the person unaccustomed to the being good of exotic food? – bukwyrm Aug 3 '18 at 14:44
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I think I understand this question better now having seen an English translation of the word in your Hausa language "santi":

Santi: to rave and gush over food; savoring delicious food by exhibiting socially subconscious behavior at a meal such as making compliments about how tasty a food is.

I don't there is an exact equivalent word in English to describe this experience with food; however we do use the expression "carried away" to describe almost any situation in which someone's excitement takes control over what they say or do.

If somebody made a statement that showed they were enjoying their food in a way that was clear their hunger/enjoyment/excitement was coming before any more rational or thought-out responses, one might say to them:

Are you getting a little carried away there?

There are also some informal, slang expressions that might fit the situation, such as feeding frenzy, although these more imply that the guest is being gluttonous, which is quite insulting to say. Laughing because someone is getting "carried away" with their food is quite light and humourous, and it doesn't imply that they are not enjoying the food.

  • The remarks may not necessarily be compliments but may be any remarks considered out of context which the speaker is thought by the listeners to have been carried away while making them. – iandu76 Jul 23 '18 at 11:11
  • @iandu76 Thanks I have revised my answer and to be honest it seems you are already familiar with the expression "carried away". I think this is probably the only equivalent expression, even though it is not specifically about food. – Astralbee Jul 23 '18 at 11:19
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    Honestly I am very happy with your answer in which you found definition of the word "Santi'' of my Hausa language. I wonder which resource you used to find it. Please could you direct me to it?. I really need to have access to it for my future reference. – iandu76 Jul 23 '18 at 11:55
  • @iandu76 Certainly it was hausadictionary.com/santi – Astralbee Jul 23 '18 at 12:14
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    I have been using 2 bilingual dictionaries and bargeryhausa.gotdns.com/frame.html. I know the phrase " be/get carried away" but due to less experience of spoken English I never thought it could be used in that scenario.Thank you so much for your contribution – iandu76 Jul 23 '18 at 12:22
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No such expression exists because the behaviour is not considered rude. When a word does not easily translate it is common for English speakers to "borrow" the word from another language.

In some cultures (such as the Hausa culture of West Africa) the act of eating is done with much more respect than in English speaking cultures Some topics are not discussed when eating: Clothing, livestock or complimenting the food are all considered bad manners. (according to my source)

In English speaking cultures it is common to compliment the food, and discuss all manner of topics. Some families even watch television while eating or talk about trivial things.

As complimenting the food is considered good manners in English speaking cultures, there is no word for describing it as bad manners.

You can use the local word, with an explanation:

My grandfather was shocked when my cousin starting saying "these plantains taste better than bananas", which was considered santi, a violation of the rules of proper behaviour. We are expected to remain dignified during supper.

You could describe the behaviour as "undignified", "impolite" or just "rude", however you will not find a perfect translation.

  • Observation noted and I edited the question. I am actually a "Hausa" person. The purpose of the question is that I am looking for English equivalent expression for a Hausa word "Santi" or "fanya" which I tried to describe in he question. – iandu76 Jul 23 '18 at 10:07
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I can't comment on Hausa social customs, but in American (or at least Californian) culture, if someone does say something inappropriate, we can pass off the faux pas by saying something like:

He was overcome (with emotion)

He was overwhelmed (by the moment)

You can also suggest the person is figuratively intoxicated:

He was drunk (with excitement)

He was giddy (with joy)

Variations on any of these can be used in the situation you describe:

It sounds like Mr. B is overwhelmed by the [name of dish].

It sounds like Mr. B is getting drunk off of the [name of dish].

In more informal situations, it can be appropriate to substitute the slang term high for drunk, to suggest intoxication from some (usually illicit) drug:

It sounds like Mr. B is getting high from the [name of dish].

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