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  1. Even if you have told us before we have been surprised because it has only been raining a little
  2. Even if you have told us before we were surprised because it has only been raining a little

What is the best sentence because I am wondering if the second one is correct. We were surprised refers to one single moment and has only been raining to a duration

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  • Could you expand a little on the context in which either of these sentences might be uttered? What is the speaker saying exactly? At any rate, the first one places the emphasis on the present, while the second one places it on that action in the past, as though you're remembering it. So I guess the question really boils down to what you want the sentence to say. – user3395 Jul 25 '18 at 11:27
  • I am on holidays on Ireland I ve been there for 7 days and am very surprised because the weather is hot and shiny,I am not remembering this feeling so I guess the first one is better – user5577 Jul 25 '18 at 11:35
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I don't find either version particularly idiomatic. Sometimes there's no way to avoid using Perfect forms - but example #1 has three unnecessary instances.

Example #2 is in some ways even worse, because it introduces a Simple Past form (we were surprised) into a Present Perfect context (you have told us, it has been raining).

Finally, I don't think this is a suitable context for using even if instead of although. As a general principle, we only use the construction even if [Assertion 1], [Assertion 2] in contexts where [Assertion 1] is a possibility (which for the sake of argument the speaker is willing to concede might be true). In OP's example it simply doesn't make sense that the speaker might be referring to the possibility that he might have been forewarned - the whole point of the entire utterance is based on the fact that he had been forewarned.

Therefore I suggest that to fix the "basic syntax" we'd need something like ...

Even though you told us before, we were surprised because it has only rained a little.

But to be honest, even though I'm not sure exactly what OP's utterance is supposed to mean, I don't think it's something a native speaker would ever say. Taking a wild guess at the intended meaning, perhaps...

Although you warned us [to expect dry weather], we were surprised how little rain there was.

(In any context I can reasonably imagine, the speaker would probably place exaggerated heavy stress on one or more of the words were, surprised, how, little, rain.)

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  • first, I must tell you that we are exchanging house with an Irish family. Before leaving for Ireland I had exchanged many emails and in each email received they said the weather was very hot. It has been a surprise because the surprise of the good weather began when we arrived and still continues up to now Has been raining only a little because it is still going on – user5577 Jul 25 '18 at 22:20
  • I'm afraid I still don't understand exactly what your example is trying to say. If they told you it was (and by implication, would continue to be) hot, and this turned out to be true, why would you be surprised? – FumbleFingers Jul 26 '18 at 12:22
  • I chose this tense present perfect to emphasise my surprise, it was not a single event but the surprise has been repeated everyday since I have been in ireland(7 days) – user5577 Jul 26 '18 at 17:41
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Even if you have told us before we have been surprised because it has only been raining a little.

Rewrite, based on the explanation about the trip to Ireland:

  • Even though you told us before we arrived about the weather, we have been surprised by how good it is and that it has only been raining a little.

  • Even though you told us before we arrived about the weather, we are still surprised by how good it is and that it has only been raining [or has only rained] a little.

Two verbs in the present perfect that apply to what you are continuing to experience in the present after being informed at a specific moment in the past about the weather. The surprise can be expressed two ways.

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