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“It’s just never recovered since she stepped away from the company,” a source told Page Six of the company Trump launched in 2007, and other sources told the same site that the company will be shuttered “ASAP.” MarketWatch reported that Klem broke the news to her 18 employees Tuesday, while Trump herself is expected to speak to the staff later.

I don't fully understand the sentence above in bold, especially a source told Page Six of the company Trump launched in 2007. Is it Trump launched the company in 2007 or a source told Page Six about the company in 2007? I don't quite understand the structure of told ... of ... either. I can't find it in my dictionary. Is it a common structure or phrase?

The full source.

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It could be either: either Trump launched the company in 2007, or the source told Page Six in 2007. The grammar does not specify which one it is.

You have to interpret it from context: The story is about current events, and it begins "First daughter Ivanka Trump is closing down her namesake clothing brand", so is it plausible that a source told Page Six "It’s just never recovered since she stepped away from the company" back in 2007?

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The newspaper doesn't want to say who gave it the information, so instead of saying "John Brown told Page Six ..." it says "a source". This source was presumably someone in the company.

"of the company that Trump Launched in 2007" Here is a relative clause "that Trump launched..." that describes and identifies the "company". The company was founded (or launched) in 2007. Trump is Ivanka Trump, the President's daughter.

If you "tell someone of something" it means the same as "tell someone about something."

So:

Someone told "Page Six" that "the company has not recovered since Ivanka Trump stepped away". The company was founded by Ivanka Trump in 2007.

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