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I have come across many sentences involving phrases like "litte to bad", "little too comfortable", "I am little too busy". What exactly does it mean ?

marked as duplicate by Tetsujin, Eddie Kal, Nathan Tuggy, Hellion, Davo Sep 5 '18 at 14:24

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    Don't confuse 'to' and 'too'. These days it seems even many natives do that & the two are really not interchangeable in any way. – Tetsujin Jul 26 '18 at 5:48
  • is it a mild form of very ? – learner12 Jul 27 '18 at 11:55
  • You already asked that in a comment below - the answer is still no. – Tetsujin Jul 27 '18 at 11:58
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"little too" in your given examples stands for "a small amount too much".

Taking one of your examples ("little too comfortable"). If someone says: "You are a little too comfortable." They think, you should be more concerned or worried about something and not as carefree as you are at that time.

  • Can this phrase be used interchangeably with 'very' ? e.g. I am very comfortable or I am very busy. – learner12 Jul 27 '18 at 2:12
  • "Very" stands for a big amount. So, no, it can't. – Geshode Jul 27 '18 at 8:20
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A little too much, a little too bad etc In spoken English people use this kind of sentences to mean that in their opinion there's something more than usual. Well, let me explain it with an example :

'..when Sara concealed from herself just a little too much that was wanting in her husband character.' In short, the sentence says : Sara concealed too many of her husband's flaws from herself.

Here "just" modifies "a little" and means "only" (in theory). "little" in turn" modifies "too much" which is the subject of the following verb "was wanting." The sentence taken literally means that she hid only a little too many of her husband's flaws from herself but I feel that there is a tone of underestimation (whatever the opposite of "exaggeration" is) and that the sentence means "she hid too many flaws" rather than "only one or two above what is desirable or normal."

"just" is an intensifier, to exclaim something

"too much" , "just too much"

You can say it in other contexts too:

"But that's unfair!", "But that's just unfair!!!!"

and in the positive :

"she was just so nice!"

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