1

In the context of that I'm talking to my friend who is going to a shop and I want him to call me immediately when he's there (and then for example I'll tell him what to buy there).

I have two choices:

Text me when you're there.

As far as I understand this choice more focus on texting when he's there, no matter when, but most of all is to texting when he's there, in the beginning or ending of his shopping.

Text me when you'll be there.

As far as I understand, this choice more focus on texting right when he's arriving there, not later.

I am not sure about my understanding and I'd like to know what's correct for my need (see the context in the beginning of the post).

  • when is not what you want if it is critical that the communication occur as soon as the person arrives. Maybe you need to warn them about something before they say anything in a meeting. ("We can't meet the price-point we had discussed because ..."). as soon as you arrive or the minute you get there are clearer expressions of "immediately" than when + present tense verb. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 26 '18 at 15:49
6

The first is correct. You don't use 'will' after conjunctions referring to future time (e.g if, when, before, until, as soon as). In fact you might prefer 'as soon as' in your example. Text me as soon as you get there. Hope that's helpul.

  • Text me when you're there could be interpreted as a directive to "repeatedly" text the person when they are located there, not necessarily immediately, but while they're there, right? (Provided it's uttered by a native speaker.) – userr2684291 Jul 26 '18 at 15:01
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    (: I'm just trying to clarify whether Text me when you're there could be intended as "Don't be afraid to text me while you're there". ("Text me, will you! Not like the last time...") – userr2684291 Jul 26 '18 at 15:08
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    Yes, depending on the context it could also meant this. – S Conroy Jul 26 '18 at 15:12
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    +1 for as soon as. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 26 '18 at 15:51
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    @Conceivableassessment - Correct, we don't say "I'll call you when I'll be there". Think of it this way: right now, you will call (because the calling is in the future), but when you call, you are there (because at the time you are calling, you are there in the present; the being there is not in the future anymore). – stangdon Jul 26 '18 at 16:59
4

Text me when you're there.

This is slightly ambiguous. Technically, it is simply a request to text someone at sometime during the period when you are at a particular location. In some contexts it may be interpreted to mean that you want someone to text you when they arrive at a particular location. As a rule it is best to avoid ambiguous sentences.

Text me when you'll be there.

This is not a sentence that would be used in standard English. As S Conroy has mentioned, 'You don't use "will" after conjunctions referring to future time', see also (Future Time)

If you want someone to text you immediately when they arrive at a particular location, you can say any of the following:

1/ Text me the instant you get/arrive there.

2/ Text me as soon as you get/arrive there.

3/ Text me when you get/arrive there.

4/ Text me (after you arrive but) before you start shopping there.

These all vary slightly in what they mean, with a decreasing order of urgency regarding texting you, but all of them should require the person to contact you before they commence shopping. In the fourth sentence the words in brackets can be omitted if you want.

It is usually advisable to give people the reason behind your request, e.g.:

Text me when you get/arrive there, and I will give you a list of the things I would like you to purchase for me.

  • You could say "Text me when you'll be there" to mean "Text me (right now) the time that you expect to arrive there", but I agree it is not what the OP means. – stangdon Jul 26 '18 at 16:57

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