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I would like to know the difference in meaning between "At my end" and "On my part". On the internet, I think it's something to do with responsibility but I need more clarification about the differences in meaning. Can I use them interchangeably in most of the cases?

I would appreciate it if the answer suggested me similar expressions that almost have closer meaning to add to my vocab.

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    They don't really have anything to do with responsibility, they just mean something like "over here", or "where I am", "in my opinion, or "from my point of view". A similar phrase (that actually sounds more natural to this US English speaker) is for my part. – stangdon Jul 27 '18 at 14:41
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    @stangdon so can't I use them this way? 1. The problem with your internet connection is not at the ISP end. It's at your end because your PC has a technical issue. 2. There's nothing I can do on my part, you should go to your account responsible. 3. we can't solve this at our department end. I think it's better to visit the technical department. where in the sentences I mean there are two parties and one of them has nothing to do with the issue so I can't solve the issue (by myself) or (by the department that I'm in) or maybe (at my end). It's not my party that can solve it. – user2824371 Jul 27 '18 at 15:07
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    Sure, you can use them that way, it's just that they don't inherently have anything to do with responsibility. You can also use them like "For my part, I thought the movie was excellent." – stangdon Jul 27 '18 at 15:46
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    "at my end" is common in any kind of geographic situation = "over here" (contrast "at your end" = "over there") such as an internet connection, a wire, a train line, my office versus your office. "On my part" = "In my opinion" or sometimes "my part" versus "your part" of an agreement. – jonathanjo Apr 24 at 19:15
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As stated in the comments, both of these phrases typically mean "from my perspective" or have to do with location (either physical or mental).

The problem with your internet connection is not at the ISP end. It's at your end because your PC has a technical issue.

This is referring to the digital location of the problem. "the ISP end" and "your end" are two locations where the problem could be occuring.

There's nothing I can do on my part, you should go to your account responsible.

Again, the speaker is saying "from my perspective" or "from where I am," I cannot do anything to help.

Have you found the source of the strange noise yet? Everything seems to be okay at my end.

As jonathanjo stated, "at my end" or "on my end" often implies physical space of some sort. In this example, the speaker is talking over distance, such as through a phone or a walkie talkie. "On my end" means "over here" or "in the place where I am." In the case of your digital example, there is physical space separated by wires.

On my part, I don't care who wins.

Whereas "on my part" or "for my part" typically is used to describe a mental positioning instead. It says "in my opinion" or "from the angle that I see."

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